Articles by: Felicity Ruby

Author Biography:

Felicity Ruby is a PhD candidate at Sydney University and co-editor of a A Secret Australia Revealed by the WikiLeaks Exposés, which will be released on 1 December 2020.

Kafka on Steroids: Summarising the Extradition Hearing of Julian Assange

Embarrassing the powerful is the harm for which the publisher is on trial, while those who have committed the crimes revealed are free to strike again, to profit again and to continue killing in cold blood.

Kafka on Acid: The Trial of Julian Assange

After waiting handcuffed in the holding cells, he is placed in a glass box at the back of the courtroom. Then he is forced back into the Serco van to be strip-searched back at Belmarsh to face another night alone in his cell.

Informit: Assange behind bars

I have only ever known Julian Assange in detention. For nine years now, I have visited him in England bearing Australian news and solidarity. To Ellingham Hall I brought music and chocolate, to the Ecuadorian embassy I brought flannel shirts, Rake, Wizz Fizz and eucalyptus leaves, but to Belmarsh prison you can bring nothing - not a gift, not a book, not a piece of paper. Then I returned to Australia, a country so far…

Assange Behind Bars, by Felicity Ruby

A visit to Belmarsh maximum-security prison

May Curious Eyes Never Run Dry, by Felicity Ruby and Scott Ludlam

On the courage of Julian Assange

Informit: May curious eyes never run dry: #FreeAssange

Within moments of Julian Assange entering a UK courtroom on 11 April 2019, what has been obvious for almost a decade was confirmed: the US government has always intended to extradite and prosecute this publisher for publishing.

Minding the Gap, by Felicity Ruby

‘Peace Pilgrims’ face seven years’ jail for protesting Pine Gap’s global surveillance capabilities

Informit: Minding the gap

Pine Gap is visible from commercial flights in and out of Alice Springs - travellers are occasionally warned that taking photos of the facility is illegal. Climbing the steep ridges of the MacDonnell Ranges or hiring a helicopter offer ways of seeing the thirty-three antennas, nineteen covered by white radomes, which Desmond Ball and colleagues described in 2016 as 'significant elements in Australian political culture...an iconic place in the Australian imaginary that vies with Uluru…