Articles by: Binoy Kampmark

Author Biography:

Dr. Binoy Kampmark was a Commonwealth Scholar at Selwyn College, Cambridge. He lectures at RMIT University, Melbourne.

The UK–Rwanda Refugee Deal: Modelling Fortress Australia

Unfortunately for those who still believe in the merits of international human rights laws, the Australian model, revised for European application, is bound to become ever more popular for populists and reactionaries. 

The Manchurian Candidate in Australian Politics

The Manchurian candidate accusation can be said to be part of the toolkit of politicisation that has characterised the brief history of the Australian Commonwealth.

Morrison, ICAC and the Berejiklian Gambit

The prime minister may have stopped the revolving door of palace coups and knifed leaders, but he has also ensured the thriving of a mephitic culture in desperate need of an airing by an integrity commission.

The Australian Way of Delusion: The Prime Minister at COP26

The Australian Way meant ‘technology, not taxes’. The airy assumption here is based upon technology that has yet to bear fruit and upon a total absence of modelling and detail.

AUKUS: It’s about Sovereignty, not Submarines

AUKUS is also a screeching message to powers in the region that the Anglophone bloc, with its vast historical baggage, intends to police the region against a country never mentioned in the joint statement but crystal clear to all present.

The Pegasus Project: The NSO Group, Spyware and Human Rights

The Pegasus Project has shed more light on the attempt by various governments across the globe to challenge encryption as both principle and practice. They have done so by resorting to the amoral expertise provided by private enterprise.

Witness K: Gangster Capitalism Meets Kafka

Australia remains…one of the most secretive and, it should be said, punitive democracies when it comes to dealing with its public servants and whistleblowing.

Losing Appetite: Australia’s War Crimes Investigation Stumbles

In 2021, the Australian effort to pursue the matter risks going under or, at the very least, losing steam. For one, events on the ground in Afghanistan are moving quickly. The Taliban forces are resurgent and eagerly awaiting the finalised departure of foreign-led forces.

Australia’s exit from Afghanistan: Niche empire and false expectations

The Australian commitment has been slavish, apelike, and automatic in both the deployment of troops and their withdrawal.

Investigating War Crimes: Israel, the Palestinian Territories and the ICC

Achieving justice through international court processes tends to be celebrated by parties who either benefit directly from them or observe them with a dispassionate eye. For the rest, it’s politics.

Why the Shock?: Australian Atrocities in Afghanistan

When brutal events take place, they are disbelieved; if they are acknowledged they are justified and rationalised as aberrations. Scapegoats are found, retribution targeted for reasons of moral expiation.

A Frozen Conflict Melts: Nagorno-Karabakh and War in the South Caucasus

Empires can prove rather loose in dividing up territory. The Soviet Union, in leaving Nagorno-Karabakh to Azerbaijan in 1923, was setting the scene for future violent squabbles, not least because the initial decision in 1921 had favoured Armenia. The former autonomous oblast comprises the north-eastern flank of the Karabakh Range of the Lesser Caucasus, extending […]