I Sing the Body of Work Electric: ChatGPT, AI, writing, technology and humanity

With such developments unrestrained, we will become more like the imitations of ourselves than computers will become like us.

Tom Nairn: In Memoriam

This means that the best way that we can honour Tom Nairn is to read his work and ponder what it means to think and act outside of the taken-for-granted ideologies that currently claim our attention.

Pressure: A Personal Reflection on British and Western Establishment Racism

To the uninitiated, this might seem like a severe personal history but among Black Britons, these types of events are often treated as tame, standard encounters that easily occur in a society in which Black Lives Matter’s deaths at the hands of the police are regarded as mere policy.

Better Access to What?: Australia’s mental health strategy misses the point entirely

Thinking about mental illness as a discrete phenomenon limits the need for broader social transformation to create a healthy and safe society.

Giving the Bird: Toondah Harbour Developments

If the project goes ahead, this well-patronised public park will be built over. Both leisure and aesthetics will be privatised.

Africa is the last roll of the dice for Big Oil

A significant part of this is about an industry in the death throes of relevancy, thrashing about for and latching onto one last opportunity for legitimacy, power and profits in the midst of crisis.

‘Your Lives Are Nothing to Me’: Political responses to the rise of climate as super-actor

It was not only the scale of social and material destruction of the world wars but the collective experience of suffering that enabled the post-conflict remaking of societies.

Pacific Moves: France and Australia in the Age of AUKUS

The notion of France as a Pacific country surprises our closest island neighbours. Members of the Melanesian Spearhead Group, for example, see it as a European country and a colonial power.

Mussolini Redux?: Could Italy’s new foreign policy trigger a passage to a multipolar world order?

Meloni’s slogan ‘The free ride is over’ is eerily reminiscent of Mussolini’s ‘mutilated victory’, which referenced Italy’s ostensible ‘betrayal’ by the Allied powers after their victory in the First World War.

Neither Their War Nor Their Peace: After Ukraine, might a multipolar world emerge?

Even before the invasion, extreme weather and the pandemic had resulted in higher shipping costs, energy price inflation, labour shortages, and rising food prices.

From the Archive

‘Fire’ may be an appropriate way to think and talk about the climate-change emergency, not just because we are literally dealing with a burning world but also because it does not bring with it the concerns associated with ‘rule by emergency’.

From the Archive

There is a curious and seldom-told backstory and parallel story to the high-profile Cambridge Analytica scandal, one that makes the notorious firm seem like the tip of the democracy-sinking iceberg.

Editorial: What Rough Beast?: Geopolitical reorderings and Western sentiment

Ukraine marks the point where the culture wars have opened out onto the geopolitical landscape, aligning progressives with neocons, humanitarians with warmongers.

Do The Maths: Why mathematics education is failing our kids

When professional mathematicians as a body declare a school mathematics curriculum to be nonsense, this need not be accepted as unassailable truth.

Fusion Net Gain Is Manufactured Ignorance

Almost every word written about ‘net energy gain’ from a fusion reaction is a species of manufactured ignorance generated by managing uncomfortable knowledge, which is complicated by a tension between the desire to trust fusion experts but and the knowledge that those experts operate under powerful incentives to engage in hype.

Will Politics Re-Organise Around the Question of Technology?

By the 1980s, the deep critique of technology, growth and the culture and psychology arising from it had been exhausted—beaten by the impasse of the historical moment.

Three Recommendations for Your Summer Reading Pile

Three extraordinary books—an activist’s memoir, a journalist’s eyewitness account and an academic’s lockdown project—are deeply interlinked.

Brave New Wild: Why ‘Resurrecting’ the Thylacine is a Dangerous Idea

Any public debate on de-extinction technologies must take account of the broader processes that are bringing such affordances into being, and the long-term social and psychological effects of regarding the latter as self-evident progress.