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The Cost of Trump’s Victory

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Progressivism has to take some of the blame and will have to deeply reconsider its project if we are to counter the forces of Trumpism.



Latest comment: All true enough, but your “progressivism” is a fantasy , and you ignore the possibly even higher...

Trump’s Victory is Our Fault

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As it begins to sink in that a political earthquake has occurred in the United States, it is obvious that the media got it wrong in just the same way it got it wrong with the Brexit vote. Wrong in the first instance, they chose to assume that Brexit had simply been an aberration. More importantly, they made this assumption because they had no way of reflecting upon the earthquake in everyday life that is the real context of the current earthquake in politics in the United States — as was the case with Brexit.

Chameleon Clinton the ‘Saviour of Children’

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In today’s race for the White House, falsehoods and deceptions are no longer marginal to political debate but rather shape much of what is said by US presidential candidates. This is shockingly true for Trump, who has organised much of his campaign around endless fabrications, sending fact-checkers into a frenzy of activity. On the other hand, Hillary Clinton has earned a reputation as a chameleon, willing to say almost anything to promote her political career. In response, Clinton has managed her truth deficit by invoking her lifelong defence of families and children. Unfortunately, Clinton only focuses on managing some of the problems that young people face, rather than doing anything to change the conditions that produce them.

An Australian Story: Moral ​Breakdown

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N’s voice was tense; he was scared. He kept apologising for imposing, his heavily accented English and my deafness an unfortunate combination. I had asked him to call me an hour later as I was on a deadline. He told me he couldn’t as he feared for his safety.

Brexit and After

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While many commentators have expressed relief that the financial dust has settled after the decision of UK voters to withdraw from the EU, there is reason to think they relax too soon. Certainly in terms of immediate effects the political shockwaves in the UK are catastrophic and any ‘solution’ for either of the main parties is likely to have a medium (and probably longer) term unraveling effect. On the one hand there is a basic loss of trust within each party, and on the other the implicit perspective that held together general political strategy — a shared sense of positive development, of what is a desirable future — has been punctured. The two orientations reinforce each other.